Publications Page

A high percep on of corrup on in Jamaica exists, both locally and interna onally. The country consistently performs poorly on global corrup on indices, with other governance indicators ci ng corrup on as a major problem for the country. Polls done domes cally reveal similar views on corrup on in the country with many locals regarding key ins tu ons in the country as being highly corrupt. This report reviewed innova ons used to strengthen integrity in countries around the world, with a view to recommending one such innova on to strengthen Jamaica’s own integrity. Having assessed the corrup on situa on in Jamaica and examined what the exis ng an -corrup on framework allows, it was found that any innova on implemented in the country must address certain contextual criteria. As corrup on was seen to be pervasive across all levels of society, any innova on would have to engage all members of society to e ect real change. Addi onally, during consulta on with several an -corrup on ins tu ons on the island, it was found that a major downfall of the innova ons they currently use is a lack of data collec on which is necessary to assess their e ec veness. Consequently, ini a ves used in Jamaica should allow for clear target-se ng and quan ca on of results. Furthermore, given the resource constraints, and in general, the economic challenges facing the country, innova ons should be cost-e ec ve and sustainable. Notably, Jamaicans have a strong inclina on to technology and innova on and thus, the ini a ve should also be technologically inspired as this may spur on the uptake by the public. 

 

February, 2014
CAPRI
Thematic Area: 

There has been a recent outcry in Jamaica against the high and increasing fees and charges being levied by banks on some of their services. The fees attracting most attention are those that relate to basic transactions such as withdrawing cash from another bank’s ATM or stopping payment on a cheque. Charges on fairly common misdemeanours, such as writing a cheque that subsequently bounces or incurring an overdra on an account are also frequently identified as being exorbitant.i Because these fees and charges are levied on fairly commonplace activities, the cumulative effect on an individual or firm can be high, and the aggregate macroeconomic effect through heightened transactions costs cannot be ignored. 

 

July, 2017
CAPRI
Thematic Area: 

Ascertaining the true cost of providing an undergraduate degree in Jamaica is critical for students, ter ary ins tu ons, and government policy-makers. For prospective and current university students, understanding the real cost of a degree may force them to make more cost-effective choices, thus, reducing the cost barrier to educa on and increasing the likelihood of nishing their degree programme. For policy-makers, this informa on is important in order to make decisions that ultimately enhance access to and choice of a aining a ter ary education. Lastly, ter ary ins tu ons, and by extension the government, would be interested in decreasing this barrier (the real cost) to tertiary education which in turn would increase access, enrolment, and contribute more significantly to economic development. 

 

 

October, 2007
CAPRI
Thematic Area: 

Research on the relationship between crime and the economy in Jamaica found two key links. One is that crime directly retards economic growth. The second is that the high rate of violent crime, apparently connected to high levels of interpersonal trust and low levels of confidence in the organs of the State - the olice and court system - heightens transaction costs and therefore diminishes economic activity. Given the apparent connection between violent crime and the loss of confidence in the state, an effective strategy to tackle crime thereby necessitates a restoration of this confidence. 

October, 2016
Natallie Rochester King
Thematic Area: 

The re-establishment of diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba, and their agenda for normalising relations hold more opportunities than threats for Jamaica. The changes in the U.S.-Cuba relationship strengthen the already positive climate for economic growth and investment in the relatively large and diverse Cuban market, and will support that country’s progressive investment policy reforms and growth in private enterprise. The prospect of further growth in the Cuban economy is an opportunity for revival of the Jamaican economy. 

 

September, 2016
Patrice Whitely
Thematic Area: 
The purpose of this study is to identify ways to improve tax compliance in Jamaica. In order to do so, a survey of literature in
tax compliance was conducted to ascertain the techniques that have and have not been working in other countries. Recent
reforms implemented by the tax authority in Jamaica, Tax Administration Jamaica (TAJ), were then identified and compared with
international best practice.
September, 2016
Yonique Campbell
Thematic Area: 

Can the Tivoli Commission of Enquiry deliver policy recommenda ons which are bene cial to Jamaican democracy? Will the government implement these recommenda ons? What kind of policy outcomes should result from the establishment of the Commission? Will the Commission u lize a problem-solving approach by making recommenda ons which respond to both the immediate problem as well as the problema cs of the garrison phenomenon, a major root cause of the May 2010 events? These are important ques ons being asked by various commentators, who have engaged in the public debates about the role of the Tivoli Commission of Enquiry and the current state of Jamaica’s socio-poli cal milieu. The purpose of this brief is to examine some of these salient policy issues. 

 

September, 2016
Jody Jones
Thematic Area: 

This report is part of a project undertaken in collaboration with the Embassy of the U.S. in Jamaica, titled "Dialogues Between Democracies". This project, which consisted of a series of events and the present research, examined the benefits and challenges of the bilateral relations between the United States and Jamaica. Focusing on the themes of Security, Health & Prosperity, Democratic Governance and Social Inclusion, "Dialogues Between Democracies" celebrated the achivements of a strong partnership, whilst providing evidence-based recommendations to strengthen this partnership, presented in this report. 

The National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA) is tasked with safeguarding public health through environmentally sound solid waste management practices but has largely failed to achieve this objective. Many have proposed privatisation as a method of overcoming the obstacles which have hindered the NSWMA. What are these obstacles? Should the NSWMA be privatised? If it should, what models of privatisation should be pursued? And what lessons could be learnt from other countries’ experiences with privatising solid waste management services? This report aims to answer these questions.

 

Jamaica generates approximately 800,000 tons of residential waste annually. The proper management and disposal of this waste is the responsibility of the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA). However, the continued dumping of waste at this waste-shed with little or no sorting poses major health and environmental concerns.
This policy brief was motivated by the need to increase awareness and understanding of the potential benefits of proper waste management and waste minimization practices. The routine occurrence of fire at the most active waste management site in Jamaica – the Riverton landfill – is also of major concern. These fires, resulting from spontaneous combustion and arson, serve to highlight the health and environmental risks associated with poor waste management practices.

There is an increasingly global consensus regarding the comparative merits of, and shift towards the adoption of electronic Government-to-Person (G2P) payments to replace cash. The emergence of the mobile phone as a low-cost, pervasive payments channel has fuelled this momentum. This study examines and presents considerations for the adoption of mobile G2P payments for the delivery of PATH benefits in Jamaica. Through the analysis of several country case studies and an examination of Jamaica’s current economic landscape and policy imperatives, the study makes the case for the use of a PPP-model of engagement for implementing a mobile PATH payments system that could become the cornerstone of a robust national mobile payments ecosystem.

Open Data has emerged as a progressive approach to issues of fiscal transparency, public sector efficiency and new job creation. Open Government Data (OGD) refers to government data and information that has been created or commissioned by a public entity which is made accessible for public use and reuse. While preliminary work has been undertaken in the Caribbean to explore the potential for open-data enabled interventions none of these studies have attempted to quantify the economic value associated with these open data opportunities. Specifically, this paper presents an estimation of the potential economic contribution of Open Data to the education, tourism and agricultural sectors, culminating with generic guidelines for developing Jamaica’s Open Data policy.

September, 2015
CaPRI
Thematic Area: 
Caribbean countries have largely failed to achieve the targets of the MDGs. Whether our governments purposefully assigned a low priority to the effort or were constrained by limited capacity, ignoring the MDGs may very well have been a good decision. However, it would be a mistake for Caribbean leaders not to engage the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).
February, 2016
CaPRI
Thematic Area: 
The Caribbean, more than any other region in the world, now faces a threat that has severe implications for its economic viability. This threat is the termination of Correspondent Banking Relationships (CBRs). Amidst concerns about money laundering and the financing of terrorism (ML/FT), several correspondent banks have been terminating or restricting business relationships with clients or categories of clients to avoid, rather than manage, the inherent risk. This action, referred to as ‘de-risking’ or ‘de-banking’, is a challenge that requires urgent and coordinated action from Caribbean economic, regulatory, and political leadership. This report therefore examines the underlying drivers of de-risking in the Caribbean, examines the impact of de-risking on the region, and proposes measures that can be taken to help to address the problem.
Most Jamaicans dream of owning a ‘big house on the hill’. While many would settle for a basic two-bedroom, concrete structure with just the basic amenities, houses are nonetheless expensive assets that require a substantial portion of buyers’ lifetime incomes. The National Housing Trust (NHT) was established in the belief that homeownership could be facilitated by a public mortgage body that built homes and subsidised the loans to purchase them. However, the current accumulated capital of J$126 billion, along with an additional J$76 billion in employee contributions held in the Trust, raises the following questions: (i) How much money does the NHT need to carry out its mandate in the way it has been doing? (ii) Is the NHT meeting its mandate? (iii) Is it using the right approach to deliver on its mandate?

The Government of Jamaica reintroduced the no-user fee policy for public health-care facilities in 2008. This study examines how the abolition of user fees has impacted health services in Jamaica. The loss of revenue from user fees has resulted in a reduction in the ability to purchase pharmaceutical and medical supplies, and hire adequate medical personal, and led to increased waiting/processing times.

January, 2013
CaPRI
Thematic Area: 

Public expenditure on education in Jamaica continues to surpass the average for developing countries, yet low test scores attest to a haemorrhaging education system. This paper assesses the current status and future prospects of nine critical dimensions of education in Jamaica.

The value of the lottery scam in Jamaica is estimated to be as much as US$300 million in one year. As a small developing state with a strong ICT infrastructure, Jamaica has been a haven for international investors seeking to cash in.

An overview of the insolvency regime in Jamaica and a proposal for the corporate rescue and rehabilitation reforms based on the best practices for insolvency, bankruptcy, receivership and administration in the Caribbean, U.K., Canada and the U.S.A.

Over the last decade, scrap metal theft has emerged as an epidemic across the globe. This paper draws lessons from the international scrap metal experience to inform the Jamaican context and makes policy recommendations for the effective regulation of the industry.

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